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Personal Learning Mission

The Personal Learning Mission assignment is intended as a take-away from CRIT 602 that you can use as a touchstone as you progress through the remaining courses in your major. It will consist of a double-spaced 1-2 page paper following the general outline below and using complete sentences throughout. Any assignment submitted later than three days after the due date will receive a zero. You should submit original work.

Guidelines:

  1. A statement of purpose that serves as an overarching goal statement for your academic and professional development or personal interest. Reviewing your Personal Narrative from earlier in the course should give you an overall goal statement that you can use for your statement of purpose, either as is or with a little editing. On the other hand, you may have changed direction since the beginning of the course or decided on a narrower area of focus, in which case you will want to develop your statement of purpose from scratch.
  2. A summary of the specific competencies for your field of study and associated professions which you have identified through the CRIT 602 assignments as essential for you to successfully meet your statement of purpose. Competencies can include skills, knowledge, abilities, and attitudes.
  3. A summary of the competencies in your field of study which you already have. Competencies can be any combination of skills, knowledge, abilities and attitudes, depending on your stage of development: Career Launcher, Career Changer, Career Advancer, or Scholar. A review of your Personal Narrative can help you with this section of your Personal Learning Mission as well. (If you think you will be including credit for prior learning in your degree plan, this section should go into a greater level of detail than if you’re going to take only CPS courses to complete the remaining requirements for your degree.)
  4. A summary of the new competencies you want to acquire as you complete the remaining courses for your bachelor’s degree. These competencies can be geared toward your academic development, your professional development, your personal interests, or a combination. You can think of these competencies as your personal learning goals.
  5. Your specific strategies for meeting your personal learning goals.

a. Other information needed for achieving any of the following goals (or other goals already named):

    1. If you are looking to make a change to a new career,
    2. If you are a seasoned professional seeking advancement but lacking the bachelor’s degree required,
    3. If you are preparing for scholarship in a graduate program,
    4. If you are pursuing a bachelor’s degree for your own personal enrichment.

 

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A statement of purpose that serves as an overarching goal statement for your academic and professional development.

Examples of Student Statements of Purpose

Examples of Student Statements of Purpose:

  • My goal is to be a licensed long-term care administrator.
  • My goal is to obtain a liberal arts education in preparation for law school.
  • My goal is to obtain the educational credentials needed for advancement in the management field.
  • My goal is to obtain the educational credentials needed for entry into the human services field.
  • My goal is to start my own childcare business.
  • My goal is to prepare for entry into a graduate program in history.A summary of the specific competencies for your field of study and associated professions which you have identified through the CRIT 602 assignments as essential for you to successfully meet your statement of purpose. Competencies can include skills, knowledge, abilities, and attitudes.

A summary of the specific competencies for your field of study and associated professions which you have identified through the CRIT 602 assignments as essential for you to successfully meet your statement of purpose. Competencies can include skills, knowledge, abilities, and attitudes.

Example of Competencies Needed for a Specific Profession

To be successful in the role of Special Education teacher requires an overall ability to create models that help diverse learners with unique familial, social and cognitive challenges to reach their full potential. Attitudes needed for success in this field are compassion, tolerance, an appreciation for diversity, and a willingness to innovate. The role requires a basic understanding of cognitive brain function, as well as familiarity with current brain research and its implications for teaching and learning.  Special Education teachers also need to be highly proficient in the use of technology as a learning tool. They also need to be able to assess students’ progress. Special Education teachers also must have highly developed oral and written communication skills, and they must be able to collaborate effectively with other professionals in co-teaching and other roles.

A summary of the competencies in your field of study which you already have.Competencies can be any combination of skills, knowledge, abilities and attitudes, depending on your stage of development: Career Launcher, Career Changer, Career Advancer, or Scholar. A review of your Personal Narrative can help you with this section of your Personal Learning Mission as well. (If you think you will be including credit for prior learning in your degree plan, this section should go into a greater level of detail than if you’re going to take only CPS courses to complete the remaining requirements for your degree.)

Example of Current Competencies Summary

The experiences gained over the years I have worked at NECC have created a solid foundation for this course of study [Instructional Design]. In addition to the initial computer skills I began with, I have both learned and trained others in the various pedagogical and technical aspects of teaching online. I have run training programs and facilitated online and on site trainings in topics such as Assessment and Evaluation, Assignments, Emerging Technology, Copyright and Fair Use, ADA/Accessibility and Usability, Creating Effective PowerPoints, Creating Web Graphics, and many more. In addition to training, I develop interactive multimedia tutorials using software such as Camtasia and Adobe Captivate, create and edit video, and serve as the streaming media server administrator and the Blackboard secondary administrator. I earned my Sloan-C certification for online teaching in 2012, by completing the certification course and several workshops. My areas of expertise in my department are Multimedia, Accessibility and Copyright.

A summary of the new competencies you want to acquire as you complete the remaining courses for your bachelor’s degree. These competencies can be geared toward your academic development, your professional development, or a combination of both. You can think of these competencies as your personal learning goals.

Example of New Competencies Summary

There are several areas of professional competency that I need to develop in order to be able to move into the next level of management in my company.  While my work experience has given me a thorough grounding in supervising, managing, and training people, I need a better understanding of how an organization’s data management needs are determined, addressed, and maintained. Although I won’t be directly involved in data management, I do need to have enough of an understanding in order to take it into account as one of several factors when making management decisions.  I also need to develop a higher level of competency in analyzing financial data to do budgeting and forecasting. Finally, I want to be involved in strategic planning, but I’m not quite sure exactly what competencies are needed for that.

Your specific strategies for meeting your personal learning goals.

Examples of Strategies for Meeting Personal Learning Goals

  • I will improve my ability to locate relevant reliable sources of best practices in my field by experimenting with the search tools in the CPS Discovery Center.
  • I will conduct an informational interview with a local professional in my field to find out more about the credentialing requirements for the career I want and how my remaining CPS courses could help me prepare for it.
  • I will improve my public speaking skills by making oral presentations in classes where there is more than one option to meet an assignment.
  • I will improve my academic and professional writing skills by writing papers in classes where there is more than one option to meet an assignment.
  • I will subscribe to an RSS feed announcing current research in my field.
  • I will explore career opportunities in my major by taking the appropriate 540 practicum course.
  • I will identify a course for one of my general electives that will give me a better understanding of how to help front-line employees survive organizational change.

Examples of Career Development Strategies

CPS’s Career Services office has developed a series of strategies to help you connect your academic coursework with your career planning and/or professional development by including the strategies in your Personal Learning Mission. The strategies are grouped by the same stages of academic and professional development that we’ve been using throughout CRIT 602.

If you are preparing to launch your career:

  • Create a career action plan to help you map out what you need to accomplish to meet your academic and professional goals.
  • Determine if certifications, licenses, or other professional development may be necessary for your career path.
  • Create a resume, cover letter, and LinkedIn Profile.
  • Identify potential professional references to be used during the hiring process.
  • Develop a networking strategy to help you meet people in your field. (This can include professional organizations.)
  • Determine ways to build your work experience and skills for launching your career. These can include:
    • Work study positions,
    • Using coursework to explore your interests related to careers,
    • Informational interviews,
    • Job Shadowing,
    • Volunteer Work,
    • Part-time paid employment,
    • Internships (for credit, or non-credit, in-person or virtual).

If you need to find out what professions are associated with your field of study:

  • Meet with Career Services (in-person or virtually) to complete career assessments to determine your career direction, including your interests, skills and work values; determine which area or which type of employer would be the best fit.
  • Use the Occupational Outlook Handbook, careeronestop, or a meeting with Career Services (in-person or virtual) to conduct occupational research to understand careers related to your major and your interests (also to understand job requirements such as years of experience, skills, technology, educational requirements and more).
  • Experience different work environments so that you can understand the kind of setting you’d prefer. Options include taking the 540 practicum course for your major (if available), volunteer work, informational interviewing, job shadowing, or work study.

If you are looking to make a change to a new career:

  • Create a career action plan to help you map out what you need to accomplish to transition into your new career.
  • Update your resume, cover letter, and LinkedIn Profile to reflect the change you’d like to make (a future-focused resume based on where you’d like to go).
  • Develop a networking strategy to help you meet people in your new field. (This can include professional organizations.)
  • Determine if certifications, licenses or other professional development may be necessary for your new career path.
  • Conduct occupational research to understand job requirements for your new career, such as years of experience, skills, technology, and educational requirements.
  • Determine ways to build your work experience and skills for your new career. These can include:
    • Work study positions,
    • Using coursework to explore your interests related to careers,
    • Informational interviews,
    • Job Shadowing,
    • Volunteer Work,
    • Part-time paid employment,
    • Internships (for credit, or non-credit, in-person or virtual).

If you are a seasoned professional seeking advancement but lacking the bachelor’s degree required:

  • Create a career action plan to help you map out what you need to accomplish to achieve the advancement you’re looking for.
  • Meet with Career Services (in-person or virtually) to complete career assessments to determine your work values and use this information to compare employers in your geographic area.
  • Conduct occupational research and review job postings to understand industry requirements for the position you’d like to obtain, such as salary information, years of experience, skills, technology, certifications, educational requirements and more.
  • Obtain any skills, licenses, certifications or advanced degrees necessary for your next step.
  • Continue to explore trends in your field – understand expectations for the field at other employers.
  • Update your resume, cover letter and LinkedIn Profile and focus on creating a professional brand.
  • Develop a networking strategy to help you expand your connections. (This can include joining professional organizations.)

If you are preparing for scholarship in a graduate program:

  • Conduct occupational research at Inside Higher Ed Careers to determine the demand for the type of scholarship you’re interested in. Include in your research the growth or decline in associated careers, as well as the experience, education, and publication required to be a competitive candidate.
  • Go back to the scholarly organization and conference resources you explored in Week 6 and research the professional biographies of conference presenters to determine the potential for additional careers for scholars in your field.
  • Research admission requirements for graduate programs supporting the scholarship you’re interested in.

If you are pursuing a bachelor’s degree for your own personal enrichment:

  • Increase self-awareness in relation to career and how you might use what you learn in your education in your day to day job.
  • Determine what avenues you wish to explore and where you can get that information.
  • Assess what you know and determine what more you would like to learn.

Additional Career Development Strategies to Consider:

  • Enroll in APST 505 Career Development and Life Planning:

This two-credit course, appropriate for all degree programs, addresses the particular concerns of adults at various stages of career development. Students will discover the conditions that guide career planning decisions and give shape to individual careers. Topics covers include interest and skill assessment, job search skills, and resume development.

Career Services is available to all College of Professional Studies students, both while you are here taking classes and once you graduate. Events, info sessions and one-on-one meetings are free and students may utilize career services as often as necessary.

Career Info Sessions offer students the ability to build skills and learn industry information from professionals already engaged in the field.

 

Key Takeaway

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